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AuthorAlabid, Alamin Hassan M.A.
AuthorIbrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed
AuthorHassali, Mohamed Azmi
Available date2016-04-18T08:10:06Z
Publication Date2014-01
Publication NameJournal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research
CitationAlabid, A.H.M.A., Ibrahim, M.I.M., Hassali, M.A. "Antibiotics dispensing for URTIs by community pharmacists and general medical practitioners in Penang, Malaysia: A comparative study using simulated patients" (2014) Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, 8 (1), pp. 119-123.
ISSN2249-782X
URIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2014/6199.3923
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10576/4408
AbstractBackground: In Malaysia, doctors in private clinics (often called dispensing doctors) are permitted to dispense medicines. This potentially may compromise rational dispensing of medicines in general and antibiotics in particular. Aim: This study explored, assessed and compared dispensing of antibiotics between Community Pharmacist (CP) and General Practitioners (GPs) regarding symptomatic diagnosis, antibiotic categories, adherence to therapeutic doses and promotion of generic antibiotics. Method: The study used trained Simulated Patients (SPs), who used a scenario of common cold symptoms at GP private clinics and community pharmacies to observe and explore the practice of antibiotics dispensing. The study was conducted within the period of May to September 2011 in Penang, Malaysia. The data was analysed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square and Fisher’s Exact Tests at alpha level of 0.05. Results: GPs dispensed more antibiotics than CPs (p= 0.001) for common cold symptoms. They dispensed more Amoxicillin (n = 14, 35%) than CPs (n = 11, 11%) (p < 0.001) and more Tetracycline (n = 3, 7.5%) while no CP dispensed this category (p = 0.022). On the other hand, CPs (n = 11, 11%) suggested brand antibiotics where as GPs dispensed only generic antibiotics (p < 0.001). Generally GPs comply better with the symptomatic diagnosis standard e.g. when asking SPs about the symptoms they had, all GPs (n = 40, 100%) complied better with this standard. Despite that, they dispensed more antibiotics (n = 26, 65%) than CPs (n = 29, 29%) (p = 0.001). GPs (n = 22, 55%) also are better than CPs (n = 16, 16%) in adherence to therapeutic doses (p< 0.001). Conclusion: Findings showed poor adherence to rational dispensing of antibiotics by both providers. Although, GPs adhere better to symptomatic diagnosis and therapeutic dosing of antibiotics than CPs, they unnecessarily prescribe and dispense more antibiotics for Upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) symptoms. Establishing prescription guidance and regulatory actions, especially for URTIs treatment, and separating of medication dispensing are seemed to be crucial steps for the reform.
Languageen
PublisherJournal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research
SubjectCommunity pharmacists
SubjectDispensing doctors
SubjectDispensing separation
SubjectGeneral practitioners
SubjectSimulated patients
TitleAntibiotics dispensing for URTIs by community pharmacists and general medical practitioners in Penang, Malaysia: A comparative study using simulated patients
TypeArticle
Pagination119-123
Issue Number1
Volume Number8


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